Configuration Settings

Every Planetmint Server configuration setting has two names: a config-file name and an environment variable name. For example, one of the settings has the config-file name database.host and the environment variable name PLANETMINT_DATABASE_HOST. Here are some more examples:

database.portPLANETMINT_DATABASE_PORT

database.keyfile_passphrasePLANETMINT_DATABASE_KEYFILE_PASSPHRASE

server.bindPLANETMINT_SERVER_BIND

The value of each setting is determined according to the following rules:

  • If it’s set by an environment variable, then use that value

  • Otherwise, if it’s set in a local config file, then use that value

  • Otherwise, use the default value

The local config file is $HOME/.planetmint by default (a file which might not even exist), but you can tell Planetmint to use a different file by using the -c command-line option, e.g. planetmint -c path/to/config_file.json start or using the PLANETMINT_CONFIG_PATH environment variable, e.g. PLANETMINT_CONFIG_PATH=.my_planetmint_config planetmint start. Note that the -c command line option will always take precedence if both the PLANETMINT_CONFIG_PATH and the -c command line option are used.

You can read the current default values in the file planetmint/__init__.py. (The link is to the latest version.)

database.*

The settings with names of the form database.* are for the backend database (currently only Tarantool). They are:

  • database.backend can only be localtarantool, currently.

  • database.host is the hostname (FQDN) of the backend database.

  • database.port is self-explanatory.

  • database.user is a user-chosen name for the database inside Tarantool, e.g. planetmint.

  • database.pass is the password of the user for connection to tarantool listener.

There are two ways for Planetmint Server to authenticate itself with Tarantool (or a specific Tarantool service): no authentication, username/password.

No Authentication

If you use all the default Planetmint configuration settings, then no authentication will be used.

Username/Password Authentication

To use username/password authentication, a Tarantool instance must already be running somewhere (maybe in another machine), it must already have a spaces for use by Planetmint, and that database must already have a “readWrite” user with associated username and password.

Default values

"database": {
    "backend": "tarantool",
    "host": "localhost",
    "port": 3301,
    "username": null,
    "password": null
    
}

server.*

server.bind, server.loglevel and server.workers are settings for the Gunicorn HTTP server, which is used to serve the HTTP client-server API.

server.bind is where to bind the Gunicorn HTTP server socket. It’s a string. It can be any valid value for Gunicorn’s bind setting. For example:

  • If you want to allow IPv4 connections from anyone, on port 9984, use 0.0.0.0:9984

  • If you want to allow IPv6 connections from anyone, on port 9984, use [::]:9984

In a production setting, we recommend you use Gunicorn behind a reverse proxy server such as NGINX. If Gunicorn and the reverse proxy are running on the same machine, then you can use localhost:9984 (the default value), meaning Gunicorn will talk to the reverse proxy on port 9984. The reverse proxy could then be bound to port 80 (for HTTP) or port 443 (for HTTPS), so that external clients would connect using that port. For example:

[External clients]—(port 443)—[NGINX]—(port 9984)—[Gunicorn / Planetmint Server]

If Gunicorn and the reverse proxy are running on different machines, then server.bind should be hostname:9984, where hostname is the IP address or FQDN of the reverse proxy.

There’s more information about deploying behind a reverse proxy in the Gunicorn documentation. (They call it a proxy.)

server.loglevel sets the log level of Gunicorn’s Error log outputs. See Gunicorn’s documentation for more information.

server.workers is the number of worker processes for handling requests. If set to None, the value will be (2 × cpu_count + 1). Each worker process has a single thread. The HTTP server will be able to handle server.workers requests simultaneously.

Example using environment variables

export PLANETMINT_SERVER_BIND=0.0.0.0:9984
export PLANETMINT_SERVER_LOGLEVEL=debug
export PLANETMINT_SERVER_WORKERS=5

Example config file snippet

"server": {
    "bind": "0.0.0.0:9984",
    "loglevel": "debug",
    "workers": 5,
}

Default values (from a config file)

"server": {
    "bind": "localhost:9984",
    "loglevel": "info",
    "workers": null,
}

wsserver.*

wsserver.scheme, wsserver.host and wsserver.port

These settings are for the aiohttp server, which is used to serve the WebSocket Event Stream API. wsserver.scheme should be either "ws" or "wss" (but setting it to "wss" does not enable SSL/TLS). wsserver.host is where to bind the aiohttp server socket and wsserver.port is the corresponding port. If you want to allow connections from anyone, on port 9985, set wsserver.host to 0.0.0.0 and wsserver.port to 9985.

Example using environment variables

export PLANETMINT_WSSERVER_SCHEME=ws
export PLANETMINT_WSSERVER_HOST=0.0.0.0
export PLANETMINT_WSSERVER_PORT=9985

Example config file snippet

"wsserver": {
    "scheme": "wss",
    "host": "0.0.0.0",
    "port": 65000
}

Default values (from a config file)

"wsserver": {
    "scheme": "ws",
    "host": "localhost",
    "port": 9985
}

wsserver.advertised_scheme, wsserver.advertised_host and wsserver.advertised_port

These settings are for the advertising the Websocket URL to external clients in the root API endpoint. These configurations might be useful if your deployment is hosted behind a firewall, NAT, etc. where the exposed public IP or domain is different from where Planetmint is running.

Example using environment variables

export PLANETMINT_WSSERVER_ADVERTISED_SCHEME=wss
export PLANETMINT_WSSERVER_ADVERTISED_HOST=myplanetmint.io
export PLANETMINT_WSSERVER_ADVERTISED_PORT=443

Example config file snippet

"wsserver": {
    "advertised_scheme": "wss",
    "advertised_host": "myplanetmint.io",
    "advertised_port": 443
}

Default values (from a config file)

"wsserver": {
    "advertised_scheme": "ws",
    "advertised_host": "localhost",
    "advertised_port": 9985
}

log.*

The log.* settings are to configure logging.

Example

{
    "log": {
        "file": "/var/log/planetmint.log",
        "error_file": "/var/log/planetmint-errors.log",
        "level_console": "info",
        "level_logfile": "info",
        "datefmt_console": "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S",
        "datefmt_logfile": "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S",
        "fmt_console": "%(asctime)s [%(levelname)s] (%(name)s) %(message)s",
        "fmt_logfile": "%(asctime)s [%(levelname)s] (%(name)s) %(message)s",
        "granular_levels": {}
}

Default values

{
    "log": {
        "file": "~/planetmint.log",
        "error_file": "~/planetmint-errors.log",
        "level_console": "info",
        "level_logfile": "info",
        "datefmt_console": "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S",
        "datefmt_logfile": "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S",
        "fmt_logfile": "[%(asctime)s] [%(levelname)s] (%(name)s) %(message)s (%(processName)-10s - pid: %(process)d)",
        "fmt_console": "[%(asctime)s] [%(levelname)s] (%(name)s) %(message)s (%(processName)-10s - pid: %(process)d)",
        "granular_levels": {}
}

log.file

The full path to the file where logs should be written. The user running planetmint must have write access to the specified path.

Log rotation: Log files have a size limit of about 200 MB and will be rotated up to five times. For example, if log.file is set to "~/planetmint.log", then logs would always be written to planetmint.log. Each time the file planetmint.log reaches 200 MB it will be closed and renamed planetmint.log.1. If planetmint.log.1 and planetmint.log.2 already exist they would be renamed planetmint.log.2 and planetmint.log.3. This pattern would be applied up to planetmint.log.5 after which planetmint.log.5 would be overwritten by planetmint.log.4, thus ending the rotation cycle of whatever logs were in planetmint.log.5.

log.error_file

Similar to log.file (see above), this is the full path to the file where error logs should be written.

log.level_console

The log level used to log to the console. Possible allowed values are the ones defined by Python, but case-insensitive for the sake of convenience:

"critical", "error", "warning", "info", "debug", "notset"

log.level_logfile

The log level used to log to the log file. Possible allowed values are the ones defined by Python, but case-insensitive for the sake of convenience:

"critical", "error", "warning", "info", "debug", "notset"

log.datefmt_console

The format string for the date/time portion of a message, when logged to the console.

For more information on how to construct the format string please consult the table under Python’s documentation of time.strftime(format[, t]).

log.datefmt_logfile

The format string for the date/time portion of a message, when logged to a log file.

For more information on how to construct the format string please consult the table under Python’s documentation of time.strftime(format[, t]).

log.fmt_console

A string used to format the log messages when logged to the console.

For more information on possible formatting options please consult Python’s documentation on LogRecord attributes.

log.fmt_logfile

A string used to format the log messages when logged to a log file.

For more information on possible formatting options please consult Python’s documentation on LogRecord attributes.

log.granular_levels

Log levels for Planetmint’s modules. This can be useful to control the log level of specific parts of the application. As an example, if you wanted the logging of the core.py module to be more verbose, you would set the configuration shown in the example below.

Example

{
    "log": {
        "granular_levels": {
            "bichaindb.core": "debug"
        }
}

Default value

{}

tendermint.*

The settings with names of the form tendermint.* tell Planetmint Server where it can connect to the node’s Tendermint instance.

  • tendermint.host is the hostname (FQDN)/IP address of the Tendermint instance.

  • tendermint.port is self-explanatory.

Example using environment variables

export PLANETMINT_TENDERMINT_HOST=tendermint
export PLANETMINT_TENDERMINT_PORT=26657
```Planetmint

**Default values**

```js
"tendermint": {
    "host": "localhost",
    "port": 26657
}